Category Archives: Main Posts

Mind Over Matter

An inspiring story (had me laughing tho)

James Ruesch

An inspiring story

Author: Anonymous

A business executive was deep in debt and could see no way out. Creditors were closing in on him. Suppliers were demanding payment. He sat on the park bench, head in hands, wondering if anything could save his company from bankruptcy.

Suddenly an old man appeared before him. “I can see that something is troubling you,” he said. After listening to the executive’s woes, the old man said, “I believe I can help you.” He asked the man his name, wrote out a check, and pushed it into his hand saying, “Take this money. Meet me here exactly one year from today, and you can pay me back at that time.” Then he turned and disappeared as quickly as he had come.

The business executive saw in his hand a check for $500,000, signed by John D. Rockefeller, then one of the richest men in…

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What NOT to do when starting a business

James Ruesch

TEN

Get involve in a business you don’t even understand

“If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable.” -Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Research! Research! Research! Good entrepreneurs investigate about what they want to establish.

Zero knowledge about your products and services will result to 99.9% failure.

You may choose a product or service that you yourself will like and patronize or if you like to offer something new, make sure to use or experience it personally.

Imagine yourself starting a Fitness Gym while you don’t even know what this is for.
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NINE

Rely on a fortune-teller and predict the future of your business

“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” -Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Nobody is certain about what is to happen tomorrow, the next day, next month, next year, or next season.

Even the predictions of famous psychics and astrologers are not…

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Philippine Cybercrime Law = E-Martial Law?

By Agence France-Presse

A new cybercrime law in the Philippines that could see people sentenced to 12 years in jail for posting defamatory comments on Facebook or Twitter is generating outrage among netizens and rights groups.

The stated aim of the cybercrime law is to fight online pornography, hacking, identity theft and spamming in the conservative Catholic nation amid police complaints they lack the legal tools to stamp out Internet crime.

However it also includes a blanket provision that puts the country’s criminal libel law into force in cyberspace, except that the penalties for Internet defamation are much tougher compared with old media.

It also allows authorities to collect data from personal user accounts on social media and listen in on voice/video applications, such as Skype, without a warrant.

Teenagers unwarily retweeting or re-posting libellous material on social media could bear the full force of the law, according to Noemi Dado, a prominent Manila blogger who edits a citizen media site called Blog Watch.

“Not everyone is an expert on what constitutes libel. Imagine a mother like me, or teenagers and kids who love to rant. It really hits our freedoms,” Dado told AFP.

Compounding the concerns, those teenagers or anyone else who posts a libellous comment faces a maximum prison term of 12 years and a fine of one million pesos ($24,000).

Meanwhile, newspaper editors and other trained professionals in traditional media face prison terms of just four years and fines of 6,000 pesos.

While harsh criminal libel legislation remains in force in other parts of Asia, Dado said the Philippine law sent the wrong signal in a country that overthrew the military-backed Ferdinand Marcos dictatorship just 26 years ago.

Dado, a lawyer’s wife known in the local online community as the “momblogger”, is among a group of bloggers and other critics of the libel element of the cybercrime law campaigning for it to be repealed.

Brad Adams, Asia director for New York-based Human Rights Watch, said the law was having a chilling effect in the Philippines, which has one of the world’s highest per capita rates of Facebook and Twitter users.

“Anybody using popular social networks or who publishes online is now at risk of a long prison term should a reader — including government officials — bring a libel charge,” Adams said.

About a third of the Philippines’ nearly 100 million people use the Internet, with 96 percent them on Facebook, according to industry figures.

Five petitions claiming the law is unconstitutional have been filed with the Supreme Court.

Senator Teofisto Guingona, the lone opponent when the bill was voted on in the Senate, has filed one of the petitions to the Supreme Court.

“Without a clear definition of the crime of libel and the persons liable, virtually any person can now be charged with a crime — even if you just re-tweet or comment on an online update or blog post,” Guingona told the court.

“The questioned provisions… throw us back to the Dark Ages.”

The five petitions all say the law infringes on freedom of expression, due process, equal protection and privacy of communication.

University of the Philippines law professor Harry Roque, who filed one of the petitions, said the Philippines was one of a shrinking number of countries where defamation remained a crime punishable by prison.

Part of the penal code that was drawn up 82 years ago, it goes against the trend in many advanced democracies such as the United States and Britain where defamation is now punished with fines rather than imprisonment, Roque said.

Amid the public backlash, some of the senators who voted for the cybercime law have started to disassociate themselves from it, even claiming they did not read the provision on libel.

However presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda has defended the cybercrime law.

“The Cybercrime Act sought to attach responsibilities in cyberspace…. freedom of expression is always recognised but freedom of expression is not absolute,” he told reporters on Thursday.

Nevertheless, Lacierda said the law could still be refined.

He called for critics to submit their concerns to a government panel that will issue by the end of the year specific definitions of the law, such as who may be prosecuted.

Proper Posture while Working on your Computer

Effective Study Habits for College Students

7 Effective Study Habits for College Students

Effective study habits are essential for success in college.  I bet that if you asked someone what they thought of first when the heard the term “college study habits” 7 out of 10 people would respond with answers like – “Staying up until the wee hours of the morning, Pulling all-nighters, Long hours in the library, etc. However, this does not have to be the case. Read on for 7 effective study habits of successful college students.

Tips for Outside of the Clasroom

1. Develop a routine. Designate a place and time strictly for studying and accomplishing work. Giving yourself a specific time-frame and place will assist you in getting into “study mode”. Try hard to keep these hours free in your schedule, only moving them if you have to. You will be surprised how much you can fit into about 2 – 3 hours of designated study time. Be sure to take small 3 – 5 minute breaks every hours to keep your mind fresh and relaxed. With any luck, developing a routine might even enable you to get ahead on your work!

2. Know What is Due When. Be sure to plan ahead. It would be a real shame if you found out you had two papers due the day before they were due. To aviod this, keep a watchful eye on your syllabus and work on these papers as you have time. If you prefer to write papers all at once, try to do it all during your scheduled study session.

3. Read Ahead! Professors schedule reading in the syllabus for a reason! Usually the reading is assigned one day ahead, so that what you read can be discussed during the next meeting of that class. Many professors like to pull pop quizzes from the assigned reading. It would be terrible to have your grades suffer all because you did not read a few pages. During especially long readings, you might be able to get away with skimming for main thoughts and points. Take notes on the reading for more reinforcement of the information.

4. SLEEP! Most professors say that the best and most productive student is a well rested student! Lack of sleep can cause fatigue, and loss of valuable information if you fall asleep during class. It is important to set a target time to go to bed each night. Realistically, somewhere in the realm of 11:00 p.m. to 1:00 am is a good time. It is preferable to get between 6 – 8 hours of sleep each night so that you can wake up and feel rested, refreshed, and ready to tackle another day of classes.

Tips for Inside the Classroom

1. Take notes. Taking good notes of the professors main lecture points will reinforce the information in your mind, and allow you to have something to look back at when studying for an exam. Many professors make it easy to take notes via the usage of handouts, PowerPoint presentations, and black/whiteboards. Don’t try to write down everything the teacher says. Copy the main points and explanations. If you can, compare your notes to those of another student to pick up anything you may have missed.

2. Interact. If you don’t understand a concept or just need clarification do not be afraid to ask your professor during class. If the professor prefers not to go about things that way, approach the professor after class or during their office hours. Many professors think highly of the students who seek out their help. It shows a desire and willingness to succeed. Most professors are happy to take the time to make sure you understand what you need to.

3. Recap. As soon as class ends, just take a minute to read over your notes and what you just learned. This will reinforce the information and keep it fresh in your mind. Do little one to two minute review sessions like this as you have oppurtunity throughout the day. This will allow you to pick up in the next class where you left off in the last class.

This is far from the “be all, end all” – end all, be all” for college study tips. I would love to hear about which study habits help you remember information and prepare you for the next class. Study well, work hard!

Source: http://garfieldgates.hubpages.com/hub/Effective-Study-Habits-for-College-Students

The Difference: Computer Science vs. Information Technology

At the most basic level, Computer Science is a “Hard” Science, well grounded in what is now known in the field of Mathematics as Information Theory. Computer Science (as a field) is concerned with developing new ideas around the use and design of computing systems, and with the mathematical concepts of computation and information.

Information Technology, on the other hand, is a practical Engineering discipline, concerned with implementing solutions to practical problems using current-day technology.
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CS Degree Focus

  • A computer science degree focuses primarily on programming with an emphasis on the foundations of computers rather than software and hardware applications.

IT Degree Focus

  • An information technology degree focuses on application integration, analysis and management. This degree has a greater focus on communication and business.

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CS Degree Jobs

  • A computer science degree is used to obtain jobs such as software engineer, research and development, interface designer and web development.

IT Degree Jobs

  • An information technology degree is used to obtain jobs such as network manager, web development, messaging administrator, web analyst, business analyst, project manager and technical analyst.

_The Future_

                          Future job prospects for both degree fields are accelerating at a faster than average pace thanks to the constant demand for new and more advanced technology. Because of the quick change in the field of computers, continuing education is important.

Source: www.ehow.comwww.wikianswers.com 

Become a Book Worm

READ.READ.READ.

Celebrating Independence Day

Technology–

Technology--

Use moderately.

Brainy Quote

For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled.

-Richard P. Feynman